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This fine warp faced weaving from the highlands of Bolivia was woven in the first half of the 19th century by Aymara Indians living at 12,500 ft. above sea level on the  ...
This fine warp faced weaving from the highlands of Bolivia was woven in the first half of the 19th century by Aymara Indians living at 12,500 ft. above sea level on the  ...
This fine warp faced weaving from the highlands of Bolivia was woven in the first half of the 19th century by Aymara Indians living at 12,500 ft. above sea level on the  ...
This fine warp faced weaving from the highlands of Bolivia was woven in the first half of the 19th century by Aymara Indians living at 12,500 ft. above sea level on the  ...
This fine warp faced weaving from the highlands of Bolivia was woven in the first half of the 19th century by Aymara Indians living at 12,500 ft. above sea level on the  ...
This fine warp faced weaving from the highlands of Bolivia was woven in the first half of the 19th century by Aymara Indians living at 12,500 ft. above sea level on the high Andean plateau known as the Altiplano. The Aymara were likely the finest weavers in the Andes with a tradition that spanned more than 2,000 years. They continued weaving using traditional dyes and alpaca fibers until the end of the 19th century. This example was made as a woman's mantle to be worn for ceremonial occasions. Known as an aksu or urku, depending on the region, it was the original woman's dress form during pre-Columbian times. Its use as a dress was outlawed by the Spanish sometime in the 16th century because of concerns over modesty. However, the aksu continued to be made after it was banned, but was used as a large mantle rather than a dress and only for special occasions. The asymmetrical layout of the pattern bands and stripes is traditional. This textile features techniques that include the use of very finely spun two ply, bi-chrome yarns which create a blended color field as seen in the details above. The red and deep purple colors were made from cochineal and the blues are indigo, both of which are native to the region. It is not known what was used to produce the strong yellow color, but whatever it was, it resists fading unlike most other yellow dyes. Pieces of this age, quality and condition are rare. Size Approximately 55 x 48 inches.
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