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Pre-columbian tie-dyed cloth panel. The original tie-dye!  Middle Horizon, Wari-related, Nasca area, South Coast of Peru. A.D. 500 - 800. This textile panel was once part of a large tunic or  ...
Pre-columbian tie-dyed cloth panel. The original tie-dye!  Middle Horizon, Wari-related, Nasca area, South Coast of Peru. A.D. 500 - 800. This textile panel was once part of a large tunic or  ...
Pre-columbian tie-dyed cloth panel. The original tie-dye!  Middle Horizon, Wari-related, Nasca area, South Coast of Peru. A.D. 500 - 800. This textile panel was once part of a large tunic or  ...
Pre-columbian tie-dyed cloth panel. The original tie-dye!  Middle Horizon, Wari-related, Nasca area, South Coast of Peru. A.D. 500 - 800. This textile panel was once part of a large tunic or  ...
Pre-columbian tie-dyed cloth panel. The original tie-dye! Middle Horizon, Wari-related, Nasca area, South Coast of Peru. a.d. 500 - 800. This textile panel was once part of a large tunic or mantle. More complicated than it appears, the textile was first woven in a discontinuous warp and weft structure that created long strips of stepped and square shaped elements using undyed alpaca yarns. During the weaving process these elements were joined together with temporary scaffold yarns. Once off the loom, strips with the two different forms (stepped and square) were tied off tightly in places so as not to take on any dye. This created areas the of small white diamond shapes in the finished product. Next, these strips were dyed in several different processes creating the green, yellow, purple and red colors seen in the textile. After this dying was complete the ties were removed and each strip was then disassembled and reassembled with warps dovetail joined and wefts slits loosely sewn up to to create the combination of forms seen in the textile. The plain weave, camel-colored alpaca sections of the textile were woven with discontinuous warps and wefts leaving some areas vacant for the later insertion of the stepped diamond designed rectangles seen in the details above. This very time consuming and complicated process required tremendous skill and patience. It was done this way because in the Andean weavers never cut pieces of cloth into various shapes - all had to be woven and finished on the loom in the desired form. This weaving process is not known to have occurred outside the Andes and is unique in the world of fiber history. Size: 32 x 59 inched - mounted.
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